La Veuve

Forum consacré à l'étude historique et culturelle de la guillotine et des sujets connexes
 
AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 La Veuve en Polynésie française

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Ven 25 Juil 2008 - 18:48

Bonjour,

Une exécution de deux chinois se serait déroulée à Papeete, le 11-08-1864 et chose étonnante, la guillotine aurait été fabriquée sur place.

Des renseignements complémentaires sont-ils possibles ?

SOURCE : http://site.voila.fr/guillotine/palmares1871_1977.html
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Titus_Pibrac
Monsieur de Paris


Nombre de messages : 647
Age : 50
Localisation : Italie, Venise
Emploi : Ingénieur
Date d'inscription : 23/05/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 12:08

Voici le lien vers un article en anglais sur la guillotine à Tahiti:

http://travel.nytimes.com/frommers/travel/guides/australia-and-pacific/french-polynesia/frm_french-pol_3007020416.html .

[quote]
The Chinese

The outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861 resulted in a worldwide shortage of cotton. In September 1862 an Irish adventurer named William Stewart founded a cotton plantation at Atimaono, Tahiti's only large tract of flat land. The Tahitians weren't the least bit interested in working for Stewart, so he imported a contingent of Chinese laborers. The first 329 of them arrived from Hong Kong in February 1865.

Stewart ran into difficulties, both with finances and with his workers. At one point, a rumor swept Tahiti that he had built a guillotine, practiced with it on a pig, and then executed a recalcitrant Chinese laborer. That was never proved, although a Chinese immigrant, Chim Soo, was the first person to be executed by guillotine in Tahiti. Stewart's financial difficulties, which were compounded by the drop in cotton prices after the American South resumed production after 1868, led to the collapse of his empire.

Nothing remains of Stewart's plantation at Atimaono (a golf course now occupies most of the land), but many of his Chinese laborers decided to stay. They grew vegetables for the Papeete market, saved their money, and invested in other businesses. Their descendants and subsequent immigrants from China now influence the economy far in excess of their numbers. They run nearly all of French Polynesia's grocery and general merchandise stores, which in French are called magasins chinois, or Chinese stores.

[code]
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titus_Pibrac
Monsieur de Paris


Nombre de messages : 647
Age : 50
Localisation : Italie, Venise
Emploi : Ingénieur
Date d'inscription : 23/05/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 12:14

Autre article:

le nom change de Chim Soo à Chim Siu Kung guillotiné le 19 mai 1869 et qui aurait été la seule personne à avoir été guillotiné à Tahiti.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/p130qmx372501673/
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titus_Pibrac
Monsieur de Paris


Nombre de messages : 647
Age : 50
Localisation : Italie, Venise
Emploi : Ingénieur
Date d'inscription : 23/05/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 12:38

Ce qui apparement n'est pas très vrai puisqu'un site de la ville de Papeete indique qu'un certain Kuan You y est guillotiné le 14.11.1921.

Citation :

14 nov 1921.
Condamné à mort pour meurtre, Kuan You est guillotiné à Papeete.

http://www.ville-papeete.pf/articles.php?id=117

Mais il a du y en avoir d'autres: Jack London raconte l'exécution d'un chinois tiré au hasard - début 1900:


http://www.janesoceania.com/tahiti_visit1/index.htm
Citation :

By mid-afternoon I had paddled halfway around this part of the island, and was nearing the village of Atimaono. It was not much of a place, but it was the setting of one of Jack London's masterpieces, his story "The Chinago." In the story some Chinese laborers - "Chinagos" - are accused of murder, and though all are innocent of the crime they are found guilty by the French magistrate and one, Ah Chow, is sentenced to hang. Another, Ah Cho, is given twenty years in a prison colony, but one morning he is taken to this village. Atimaono, and told that he is to be beheaded. He protests to the various gendarmes - it is a case of mistaken identity, because the names are so similar - and at last, pleading for his life and proving he is not the condemned man, he is believed. but the French officials confer. They have come a long way from Papeete. The guillotine is ready. Five hundred other laborers have been assembled to watch. A postponement to find the right man would mean being bawled out by the French bureaucrats for inefficiency and time-wasting. Also it is a very hot day and they are impatient.
All this time Ah Cho listens and watches. At last, but kn owing they have the wrong man, one French policeman says, "Then let's go on with it. They can't blame us. Who can tell one Chinago from another? We can say that we merely carried out instructions with the Chinago that was turned over to us ..."
And, still making excuses, the French strap down the innocent Chinese man and strike off his head. "The French, with no instinct for colonization," London writes at one point, and that is the subject of the grim story.


http://www.classicreader.com/book/1457/1/

Citation :

"It is a mistake," said Ah Cho, gravely. "I am not the Chinago that is to have his head cut off. I am Ah Cho. The honourable judge has determined that I am to stop twenty years in New Caledonia."

The gendarme laughed. It was a good joke, this funny Chinago trying to cheat the guillotine. The mules trotted through a coconut grove and for half a mile beside the sparkling sea before Ah Cho spoke again.

"I tell you I am not Ah Chow. The honourable judge did not say that my head was to go off."

"Don't be afraid," said Cruchot, with the philanthropic intention of making it easier for his prisoner. "It is not difficult to die that way." He snapped his fingers. "It is quick--like that. It is not like hanging on the end of a rope and kicking and making faces for five minutes. It is like killing a chicken with a hatchet. You cut its head off, that is all. And it is the same with a man. Pouf!--it is over. It doesn't hurt. You don't even think it hurts. You don't think. Your head is gone, so you cannot think. It is very good. That is the way I want to die--quick, ah, quick. You are lucky to die that way. You might get the leprosy and fall to pieces slowly, a finger at a time, and now and again a thumb, also the toes. I knew a man who was burned by hot water. It took him two days to die. You could hear him yelling a kilometre away. But you? Ah! so easy! Chck!--the knife cuts your neck like that. It is finished. The knife may even tickle. Who can say? Nobody who died that way ever came back to say."

He considered this last an excruciating joke, and permitted himself to be convulsed with laughter for half a minute. Part of his mirth was assumed, but he considered it his humane duty to cheer up the Chinago.

"But I tell you I am Ah Cho," the other persisted. "I don't want my head cut off."

Cruchot scowled. The Chinago was carrying the foolishness too far.




Citation :


Schemmer had made the guillotine himself. He was a handy man, and though he had never seen a guillotine, the French officials had explained the principle to him. It was on his suggestion that they had ordered the execution to take place at Atimaono instead of at Papeete. The scene of the crime, Schemmer had argued, was the best possible place for the punishment, and, in addition, it would have a salutary influence upon the half-thousand Chinagos on the plantation. Schemmer had also volunteered to act as executioner, and in that capacity he was now on the scaffold, experimenting with the instrument he had made. A banana tree, of the size and consistency of a man's neck, lay under the guillotine. Ah Cho watched with fascinated eyes. The German, turning a small crank, hoisted the blade to the top of the little derrick he had rigged. A jerk on a stout piece of cord loosed the blade and it dropped with a flash, neatly severing the banana trunk.

"How does it work?" The sergeant, coming out on top the scaffold, had asked the question.

"Beautifully," was Schemmer's exultant answer. "Let me show you."

Again he turned the crank that hoisted the blade, jerked the cord, and sent the blade crashing down on the soft tree. But this time it went no more than two-thirds of the way through.

The sergeant scowled. "That will not serve," he said.

Schemmer wiped the sweat from his forehead. "What it needs is more weight," he announced. Walking up to the edge of the scaffold, he called his orders to the blacksmith for a twenty-five-pound piece of iron. As he stooped over to attach the iron to the broad top of the blade, Ah Cho glanced at the sergeant and saw his opportunity.

"The honourable judge said that Ah Chow was to have his head cut off," he began.

The sergeant nodded impatiently. He was thinking of the fifteen-mile ride before him that afternoon, to the windward side of the island, and of Berthe, the pretty half-caste daughter of Lafiere, the pearl-trader, who was waiting for him at the end of it.

"Well, I am not Ah Chow. I am Ah Cho. The honourable jailer has made a mistake. Ah Chow is a tall man, and you see I am short."

The sergeant looked at him hastily and saw the mistake. "Schemmer!" he called, imperatively. "Come here."

The German grunted, but remained bent over his task till the chunk of iron was lashed to his satisfaction. "Is your Chinago ready?" he demanded.

"Look at him," was the answer. "Is he the Chinago?"

Schemmer was surprised. He swore tersely for a few seconds, and looked regretfully across at the thing he had made with his own hands and which he was eager to see work. "Look here," he said finally, "we can't postpone this affair. I've lost three hours' work already out of those five hundred Chinagos. I can't afford to lose it all over again for the right man. Let's put the performance through just the same. It is only a Chinago."

The sergeant remembered the long ride before him, and the pearl-trader's daughter, and debated with himself.

"They will blame it on Cruchot--if it is discovered," the German urged. "But there's little chance of its being discovered. Ah Chow won't give it away, at any rate."

"The blame won't lie with Cruchot, anyway," the sergeant said. "It must have been the jailer's mistake."

"Then let's go on with it. They can't blame us. Who can tell one Chinago from another? We can say that we merely carried out instructions with the Chinago that was turned over to us. Besides, I really can't take all those coolies a second time away from their labour."

They spoke in French, and Ah Cho, who did not understand a word of it, nevertheless knew that they were determining his destiny. He knew, also, that the decision rested with the sergeant, and he hung upon that official's lips.

"All right," announced the sergeant. "Go ahead with it. He is only a Chinago."

"I'm going to try it once more, just to make sure." Schemmer moved the banana trunk forward under the knife, which he had hoisted to the top of the derrick.

Ah Cho tried to remember maxims from "The Tract of the Quiet Way." "Live in concord," came to him; but it was not applicable. He was not going to live. He was about to die. No, that would not do. "Forgive malice"--yes, but there was no malice to forgive. Schemmer and the rest were doing this thing without malice. It was to them merely a piece of work that had to be done, just as clearing the jungle, ditching the water, and planting cotton were pieces of work that had to be done. Schemmer jerked the cord, and Ah Cho forgot "The Tract of the Quiet Way." The knife shot down with a thud, making a clean slice of the tree.

"Beautiful!" exclaimed the sergeant, pausing in the act of lighting a cigarette. "Beautiful, my friend."

Schemmer was pleased at the praise.

"Come on, Ah Chow," he said, in the Tahitian tongue.

"But I am not Ah Chow--" Ah Cho began.

"Shut up!" was the answer. "If you open your mouth again, I'll break your head."

The overseer threatened him with a clenched fist, and he remained silent. What was the good of protesting? Those foreign devils always had their way. He allowed himself to be lashed to the vertical board that was the size of his body. Schemmer drew the buckles tight--so tight that the straps cut into his flesh and hurt. But he did not complain. The hurt would not last long. He felt the board tilting over in the air toward the horizontal, and closed his eyes. And in that moment he caught a last glimpse of his garden of meditation and repose. It seemed to him that he sat in the garden. A cool wind was blowing, and the bells in the several trees were tinkling softly. Also, birds were making sleepy noises, and from beyond the high wall came the subdued sound of village life.

Then he was aware that the board had come to rest, and from muscular pressures and tensions he knew that he was lying on his back. He opened his eyes. Straight above him he saw the suspended knife blazing in the sunshine. He saw the weight which had been added, and noted that one of Schemmer's knots had slipped. Then he heard the sergeant's voice in sharp command. Ah Cho closed his eyes hastily. He did not want to see that knife descend. But he felt it--for one great fleeting instant. And in that instant he remembered Cruchot and what Cruchot had said. But Cruchot was wrong. The knife did not tickle. That much he knew before he ceased to know.

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titus_Pibrac
Monsieur de Paris


Nombre de messages : 647
Age : 50
Localisation : Italie, Venise
Emploi : Ingénieur
Date d'inscription : 23/05/2008

MessageSujet: En français   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 12:45

http://w3.framespa.univ-tlse2.fr/revue/articles_fiche.php?id=263

Citation :

En 1869, la guillotine fut utilisée pour la première fois dans la colonie française de Tahiti pour mettre à mort un des coolies chinois travaillant sur la plantation de coton d’Atimaono. Chim Soo Kung était accusé du meurtre d’un de ses compatriotes lors d’une rixe entre travailleurs. Les circonstances confuses dans lesquelles eut lieu cette exécution sont relatées par Jack London dans une nouvelle écrite en 1908, The Chinago1. La nouvelle est entièrement narrée à partir du point de vue d’un des témoins du meurtre qui se retrouve accusé à tort. Certain de son innocence, il rêve d’une retraite paisible au village natal une fois qu’il aura fait fortune. A l’issue du procès, alors qu’il se fait emmener au lieu de l’exécution, il parvient avec difficulté à faire comprendre au gendarme qu’il y a erreur sur la personne. Celui-ci considère qu’il n’est pas responsable de cette méprise, et puisque après tout, « il ne s’agit que d’un Chinago », il préfère appliquer l’ordre qui lui a été donné et abat la guillotine.

2Jack London s’est saisi de l’affaire Chim Soo Kung comme un point de départ à l’exploration littéraire des thèmes de la mésentente et de la mésinterprétation, à travers l’histoire d’un coolie pris au piège d’un système combinant le capitalisme de la plantation anglaise et la législation coloniale française. La guillotine clôture le texte et met un terme aux efforts d’interprétation. Le condamné était-il réellement coupable ? Ne s’était-on pas trompé de personne ? Les archives de l’époque ne procurent guère d’éclaircissements sur cette affaire. Ce flou historique alimente les divergences d’interprétations qui prévalent aujourd’hui au sein de la communauté chinoise. Pour beaucoup, Chim Soo Kung s’est sacrifié alors même qu’il était innocent ; il est donc le martyr grâce auquel les Chinois ont pu s’installer en terre polynésienne et y demeurer jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Mais ils sont aussi nombreux à remettre en doute la réalité de son sacrifice, soit qu’ils le considèrent comme coupable, soit qu’ils émettent, sur le mode de la plaisanterie, l’hypothèse qu’il était un « volontaire désigné » par ses camarades de la plantation. Est donc en question le statut qu’il faut conférer à Chim Soo Kung. Ancêtre métaphorique ? Malemort déifié ? Anonyme qu’il vaudrait mieux oublier ? L’absence de consensus sur le statut de Chim Soo Kung renvoie plus largement à l’opposition entre ceux qui revendiquent un passé de coolies, et ceux qui le rejettent avec véhémence.

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
chogokinman
Aide confirmé
avatar

Nombre de messages : 34
Age : 42
Date d'inscription : 25/10/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 21:18

Il me semble que Fernand Meyssonier en fait allusion dans son livre quand il voulut exposer la guillotine et que le maire a refusé car cela aurait indisposé la communauté chinoise à cause "d'une double exécution d'émigrés chinois en 1926" (Paroles de bourreau, p.238).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Titus_Pibrac
Monsieur de Paris


Nombre de messages : 647
Age : 50
Localisation : Italie, Venise
Emploi : Ingénieur
Date d'inscription : 23/05/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Jeu 18 Déc 2008 - 21:31

C'est bien possible - sauf qu'apparemment la date n'est pas très certaine - je la vois pluto^t vers 1860-70 qu'en 1926.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Jourdan coupe tête
Bourreau départemental
avatar

Nombre de messages : 251
Age : 63
Localisation : Paris
Date d'inscription : 13/12/2008

MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   Mar 24 Mar 2009 - 23:30

Quelques précisions sur la guillotine de Tahiti…

Dans les premiers jours d’avril 1869, à la plantation de la compagnie Soarez, à Atimaono (côte ouest de Tahiti) une rixe éclate entre des ouvriers chinois, faisant un mort et un blessé grave. A la suite de l’instruction judiciaire, huit d’entre eux sont arrêtés et traduits devant le tribunal criminel, séant à Papeete. Dans la nuit du 12 au 13 mai, deux des inculpés sont acquittés, deux condamnés à cinq ans d’emprisonnement et quatre autres condamnés à la peine capitale. Trois de ces derniers obtiendront une grâce.
Comment exécuter la séance ? Tahiti ne possédant aucune guillotine. Les autorités décident alors d’en construire une, sur les lieux mêmes du meurtre, à Atimaono.
A défaut de plans, on imagine une machine rudimentaire. Puis on procède à des essais sur des troncs de bananiers, sur des chiens, enfin sur des moutons et des porcs.
L’exécution est fixée au mercredi 19 mai 1869. Par un incroyable concours de circonstances, c’est un des trois chinois qui a été gracié qui est d’abord envoyé, par erreur, sur les lieux du supplice. Heureusement pour lui, à son arrivée sur la plantation, on s’aperçoit de la tragique méprise. Il faut envoyer un express à Papeete pour faire venir le vrai condamné. Sur place, un cordon de sécurité a été formé avec des détachements d’infanterie et d’artillerie de marine, renforcés d’une compagnie de débarquement de l’aviso d’Entrecasteaux. Le supplicié est conduit au pied de la guillotine, on lui lie les pieds et les mains, puis on le pousse sur la planche. On déclenche le couperet. Il reste immobile. Plusieurs hommes tentent de le dégager. Sans succès. La machine a été peinte la veille avec du coltar, une sorte de goudron minéral, et cet enduit a fait corps avec le bois, si bien qu’il est impossible au mouton de coulisser entre les rainures. Le chinois est retiré de sa position. Autour de l’échafaud, où se pressent de nombreux curieux, l’émotion est générale. On va chercher un charpentier qui arrive avec ses outils. Malgré ses efforts, le couperet refuse obstinément de bouger. Même à coups de masse, on ne parvient pas à le faire descendre. Enfin, avec l’aide de plusieurs ouvriers on finit par écarter les montants de la machine. La lame est dégagée, on la fait chuter plusieurs fois. La guillotine est prête à fonctionner. L’opération a duré près de quarante-cinq minutes durant lesquelles le condamné est resté impassible. Il est replacé sous le couperet. L’exécution est enfin terminée.

Cette incroyable histoire a été racontée par le Messager Franco Américain de New York. Comment l’écrivain Jack London en a-t-il eu connaissance ? Toujours est-il, qu’en 1908, il s’en inspira pour publier une nouvelle intitulée The chinago.

Vingt ans plus tard, les Etablissement Français de l’Océanie firent l’acquisition d’une vraie guillotine. En janvier 1891, un procès verbal du Conseil Général de Tahiti enregistre une dépense de 3000 francs, réglée à M. Deibler, exécuteur des hautes œuvres, pour « fourniture d’un instrument de justice ». Cette machine n’a pas souvent été utilisée. On sait qu’un aide de l’exécuteur d’Alger, venu s’installer en Polynésie vers les années soixante, s’y intéressa beaucoup. Après avoir essayé de la racheter, il obtint l’autorisation de la restaurer. Transportée sur l’île de Mooréa, elle a officiellement disparu au cours d’un transport. Les lecteurs de ce forum savent maintenant qu’elle fut escamotée et rapatriée en France.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://histoiresdebourreaux.blogspot.com/
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: La Veuve en Polynésie française   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
La Veuve en Polynésie française
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» La Veuve en Polynésie française
» Des algériens dans une énigmatique association française
» La Croix Rouge Française recrute ...
» ORDRE DES INFIRMIERS DE POLYNÉSIE FRANÇAISE
» Anthologie de la poésie française

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
La Veuve :: LA VEUVE-
Sauter vers: